GAIN Final Conference: online and public

The GAIN journey reached its end. After three and half years of intense and fruitful research, innovation and cooperation at European and worldwide level, we are eager to share our outputs and findings with the economic sector, the scientific community and the policy actors at national and international level.

This project final meeting will be the occasion to present to a wider public the lessons learned and the results achieved by the GAIN consortium, with particular attention to follow-up, replication and exploitation opportunities.

The event will be held online, via Zoom platform. Participation is free and open to everyone; for organizational purposes a registration is required.

We hope you will join us in this important date for the GAIN project, and we would appreciate if you could share this news with your contacts, your academic network and any potential stakeholders!

Don’t forget to register at: https://www.epcsrl.eu/gain-final-public-meeting/ until 26.10.2021.

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“Good Fish – Good Food” online conference

October 16th is the international #WorldFoodDay

GAIN partners invite you to celebrate this date by attending the online conference “Good Fish – Good Food: Drive the transformation towards sustainable food for all”, an occasion for discussing about sustainability and innovation in and for the food sector.

Register for Good Fish Good Food at www.epcsrl.eu/good-fish-good-food/.

How can we really achieve fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly food systems? What does it means sustainability from farm (and sea) to fork? Are we ready for a change in our production and consumption habits?

We will discuss with Christine Mauracher from the Agrifood Management & Innovation Lab of Ca’ Foscari University, with chef Stefano Polato, who cooks for astronauts at the Argotec Space food Lab, with Joao Ferreira from Longline Environment, expert of sustainability for the aquaculture and fisheries sectors, with Marie Shrestha from ttz Bremerhaven, who will bring cities and policy actors point of view, and with Roberto Pastres and Raffaella Lioce, bringing the experience of two large European projects, GAIN on sustainable aquaculture, and Cities2030 on urban food systems.

The participation at the event is free and open to everyone. For organizational purpose we ask to register by October 14th through this link www.epcsrl.eu/good-fish-good-food/.

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GAIN Summer School Finale

The GAIN Summer School “Ecological Transition of Aquaculture” was successfully held online from August 30th to September 3rd, 2021!

With more than 40 participants and experts from all over the world, we have spent an amazing week discussing Precision Aquaculture, Circular Economy, Sustainability Assessment, Policies and Markets.

Speakers presented a state of-the-art knowledge of the main challenges facing the aquaculture sectors as well as the the solutions developed by the GAIN consortium to successfully engage the ecological intensification of fish and shellfish farming.

They had, in particular, an overview of innovative methods and relative tools (Life Cycle Analysis, Precision Fish Farming) which are going to play a major role in the ecological transition of this sector.

The school aimed at giving all the students an adequate knowledge to help them building the sustainable future aquaculture needs.

The GAIN Summer School team would like to thank to all the participants!

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Do we know how much fish we eat?

by: Andre Lopes

The GAIN project found that some of the most popular seafood’s in Europe appear to have a higher consumption than that reported in official statistics. The report, based on seafood demand data, focused on ten European countries and a large number of seafood products.

In addition to demand data, new supply statistics were considered to include other sources of seafood, including subsistence and illegal fishing. This showed that for cod, salmon, or tuna, consumption may be higher than previously estimated.

We found that salmon, the most consumed farmed aquatic product in the EU, appears to have a consumption of 2.21 kg per capita, significantly higher than the 1.30 kg per capita estimates based on supply data. This means that each European consumer appears to eat almost one extra kg each year of salmon unaccounted for in official statistics. Although an extra 900 grams of salmon eaten annually by each person only corresponds to an extra meal every two months, if this gap is scaled up to the European population the numbers are of concern.

Similar numbers were determined for tuna, cod, trout, and other common seafood products. Total consumption of seafood in Europe could be as much as 4.3 kg per capita for farmed products and 8.9 kg per capita for wild-caught products.

Taken on aggregate, the mass balance gap for aquatic products, i.e. from fisheries and aquaculture combined, means that as much as one million metric tons per year of seafood could end up on European plates without being recorded in official statistics.

The most likely reason for this substantial discrepancy between supply and demand data are flaws in the datasets—collectively, this introduces substantial uncertainties for policy outcomes. The GAIN project makes a number of suggestions for improvements in this critical area—without good data, there are no good decisions.